La Pollera, Panama’s national dress

January 01, 2010 By: Administrator Category: Culture

polleras-blogThe Pollera is the most beautiful and admired national costume of the Americas. There are many tales related about its origin, but the popular opinion is that it was adapted from a gypsy dress worn in Spain at the time of the conquest of Peru and brought to Panama by the servants of the colonial families. It normally consists of a blouse or shirt and a two-tiered full skirt.
The lavish satins and brocades that made up the dress of society at that time were not suited to the tropical climate and the servants’ garb was appropriated by the mistress and enhanced with lace and embroidery. It was not worn outside of the home but gradually the ladies added more lace and ribbons, ornaments for the hair (tembleques) and jewelry for the neck and eventually it made its way into the public eye.

The experts agree that the ground cloth must be white and the 12 yards of material required can be fine linen, cambric or voile. The motifs may be formed by birds, flowers, fruit, vines, garlands or native designs. The height of elegance is achieved when these designs are executed in “talco en sombra” which is hand-sewn appliqué; however, they can be also created in cross stitch or embroidery. The cost of the gala costumes runs into hundreds and sometimes, thousands of dollars, depending on the hand work involved.

The basic pieces of the pollera are the gown or upper part, the skirt or lower part and the petticoat or underskirt. The gown or blouse consists of two ruffles, appliquéd or embroidered in favored color and design edged with valencienne lace and gracefully draped from handmade thread lace insertion at the neckline (this blouse is worn off the shoulder.) Wool is woven in and out of the insertions and two big pom-poms are centered at the chest and back. The wool must be the same color as the shoes, which are heel-less and made from velvet or satin.

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The skirt is two wide pieces ornamented with the chosen motif and joined together with insertion and bordered with insertion and lace. It is very fully gathered on a waist band. Four wide ribbons hang from the waist, two in the center front and two in the back–they are called “gallardetes”, meaning “graceful streamers”. The petticoat is often as elaborate as the skirt but is always pure white and the trimming is hand-made thread lace

The ornaments, “tembleques”, for the hair are exquisite. A large tortoise shell comb embellished with pearls and gold is worn on top of the head and resembles a crown. This is the key piece and the gold hairpins and tembleques, which are quivering pins and worn in pairs, are placed on the head to give the appearance of a radiant halo. Two small discs tied to the hair at the temples with black silk thread and large gold filigree earrings with pearls or corals complete the head dress.

The jewelry adorning the neck usually consists of a pearl or coral rosary, a flat gold chain or “cadena chata”, a chain of gold coins and a gold cross on a black velvet ribbon worn as a choker. The jewelry worn with the pollera in the olden days was indicative of one’s wealth and sometimes as many as a dozen chains were worn, all of pure gold and precious gems. A large gold and pearl button or rosetta is worn over the wool pom-pom and a purse suspended from the waistline and fastened with two gold brooches is the finishing touch.

Four days before Ash Wednesday are “carnival” days and La Pollera comes into its own. The streets are filled with merry makers and each Pollera one sees seems to be more beautiful that the last. La Pollera has to be seen to appreciate the work and imagination that produces this loveliest of dresses. The grace and enchantment of the Panamanian women is never more in evidence that when she is wearing La Pollera.

Restaurant Picks

May 15, 2009 By: Administrator Category: Culture, Food, Travel guide

cevichePanama’s culinarly landscape is a reflection of its cultural diversity. You can find most types of food that you are looking for in the city. However hear are just a few recommendations that we will be updating periodically and remember we’re always here to make a reservation or if you have suggestions, let us know!

Local Spots

Niko’s Cafe (Balboa)-

A traditional Panamanian spot to get a quick, casual, and cheap meal, food is served cafeteria style. The sandwhiches are recommended. A 5min walk from Balboa Inn.

Rodizio‘s $$

A Brazilian restaurant within 5 minutes of the Balboa Inn. They serve an all you can eat deal of grilled meats and salads ($20 p/person)

Los Templarios- $

This small restaurant has a wide variety of dishes on it’s menu, including pasta seafood and some traditional Panamanian dishes. It’s also just a short walk from our Inn on the street heading towards the Amador Causeway.

City Center

Machu Picchu (El Cangrejo)-$$

A restaurant popular with the in-the-know Panamanians, they serve delicious traditional Peruvian food. Make sure to try the Pisco Sour.

Las Tinajas (Bella Vista)-$$$

A very popular restaurant because of its folkloric show offered T-Sat(9pm). Aside from the show the food is delicious, a great place if you’re las-tinajaslooking to experience Panamanian food in a fine dining atmosphere. Just a sidenote, the show is $5 and its a $12p/person minimum consumption.

El Trapiche (Via Argentina)- $

A popular place that serves hearty traditional Panamanian food as well, but there’s no dance here. However if you want something traditional, quieter, and less touristy this is the place.

Eurasia (Bella Vista)- $$$

As evident by it’s name Eurasia serves European cuisine with an Asian influence, it’s one of the famous restaurants of Panama, located in the neighborhood of Bella Vista near Parque Urraca. This is the place to go for a fine dining experience in Panama City; great food, great service, and great ambiance.

La Posta (Calle Uruguay)-$$$

A relatively new restaurant La Posta has quickly become known as one of the best places in town. Their menu consists of plenty of seafood dishes along with some meat and pasta dishes, classic dishes with a latin flavors.

Amador Causeway/Canal Area

Cafe Barko-$$

This restaurant is located on Isla Flamenco in the Causeway. From there you know you are going to have nice ocean views along with your meal. They serve seafood, sushi, and traditional Panamanian food…this is the place if you’re looking for lobster or fresh and delicious ceviche. The staff is bilingual which could be a plus if you’re spanish is rusty or nonexistent.

Mi Ranchito-$

Right on the water and very popular with locals and tourists alike this place can get very busy, they serve mainly traditional Panamanian cuisine. A good place for groups and families but not if you’re looking for a quiet place to dine.

Miraflores Restaurant (Miraflores Locks)-$$

This restaurant has the most amazing views as it is located right on the Miraflores locks of the Panama Canal. It is a very popular restaurant so reservations are a must, however if you can’t make it to dinner come in the afternoon and have a drink on the terrace and enjoy the views.

Casco Viejo

Manolo Caracol-$$

This restaurant lies near the edge of Casco Viejo on the corner of Avenida Central y Calle 3ra. The chef is Spanish from the province of Andalucia. They serve a fixed menu that comes with a variety of plates. The dishes are creative and delicious and the atmosphere romantic for dinner.

CasaBlanca-$

This is perhaps a more casual option for those looking to dine in Casco Viejo. This restaurant is located inside Hotel Colombia on Plaza Bolivar. They serve the usual typical fusion style cuisine but the food is very good and the atmosphere relaxed.

Mercado de Mariscos (Ave de Balboa)-$

A fish market that has a small restaurant upstairs. You won’t find fresher fish in Panama and you don’t have to stay for dinner, just pick-up a delicious serving of ceviche downstairs in the market area.

Fiesta Patronal Virgen del Carmen, Isla Taboga

May 14, 2009 By: Administrator Category: Culture, History

Every year on July 16 the people of Taboga pay tribute to their Patroness La Virgen del Carmen.

The holiday is based on a story passed on through the people of Taboga for centuries. According to this story around the 16th century the island and its peole were plagued by pirate attacks because of its use as a port for Panama City at the time.

taboga-virgencarmenOne day around noon the people of Taboga Island were preparing once again to defend themselves from the pirates and as they were heading towards the beach armed with sticks and stones they saw a woman on the sand facing the approaching ships. To the pirates this woman appeared to be the commander of the armed group and upon seeing her they quickly retreated and left the island in peace. The townspeople unaware of what had happened went to the island’s church to give thanks to God. When they arrived they saw wet footprints leading up to the altar and the statue of the Virgen del Carmen’s feet were wet and covered with sand.

The people believed that she had protected them from the attack and thus named her Patron Saint and Protector of the Island of Taboga.

The island celebrates this day with a boat parade and on the weekends with special church services and celebrations.